Akita_Nairiku_Jūkan_Railway_Akita_Nairiku_Line

By Wikipedia
Akita Nairiku Line
Moriyoshi express.jpg
Akita Nairiku Jūkan Railway Moriyoshi Express train, October 2005
Overview
Type Heavy rail
Status Operational
Locale Akita Prefecture
Termini Takanosu
Kakunodate
Stations 29
Website www.akita-nairiku.com
Operation
Opening 1930
Owner Akita Nairiku Jūkan Railway Company
Technical
Line length 94.2 km (58.5 mi)
Track gauge 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Electrification None
Operating speed 85 km/h (55 mph)
AN-8800 series

The Akita Nairiku Line (秋田内陸線 Akita Nairiku-sen?) is a Japanese railway line located in Akita Prefecture in northern Japan. It operates between Takanosu in the city of Kitaakita and Kakunodate in the city of Senboku. The Akita Nariku Line is the only railway line operated by the Akita Nairiku Jūkan Railway (秋田内陸縦貫鉄道 Akita Nairiku Jūkan Tetsudō?, "Akita Inland Longitudinal Railway").

History[edit]

Aniai Line[edit]

On December 10, 1934, the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) opened the Aniai Line (阿仁合線?) connecting Takanosu with Yonaizawa over a length of 15.1 kilometers.[1] The line was extended to Ani-Maeda by November 16, 1935 and to Aniai by September 15, 1936.[citation needed] The main purpose of the line was to serve the Ani Mines, one of the largest gold, silver and copper mines in Japan at the time.[citation needed] Following World War II, the JGR became the Japanese National Railways (JNR), and the line was further extended to Hitachinai by October 15, 1963.[1] On November 1, 1971, the JNR Kakunodate Line began operations from Kakunodate to Matsuba.[1] The Kakunodate Line was closed on September 11, 1981, followed by the Aniai Line on June 22, 1984.[citation needed]

Reopening[edit]

The third-sector Akita Nairiku Jūkan Railway Company reopened the Aniai Line on November 1, 1986 as the Akita Nairiku Kita Line, and reopened the Kakunodate Line on the same date as the Akita Nairiku Minami Line.[1] A newly built track linked the two lines from April 1, 1989, including the 5674m Junidan Tunnel.[1] However, since the line serves sparsely populated areas, it faces severe business challenges.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Terada, Hirokazu (19 January 2013). データブック日本の私鉄 [Databook: Japan's Private Railways]. Japan: Neko Publishing. p. 26. ISBN 978-4-7770-1336-4. 

External links[edit]

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